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Written by: Prof. Alkis Raftis


The choreographer, as an architect of movements, is, first of all, a technician. He knows the possibilities of the body (anatomy, physiology, pathology).

The architect uses technical materials to create a construction in a particular place. The choreographer uses intangible forms, to create an impression in place and time.

An architect has two dimensions: he is an engineer and an artist at the same time. An engineer because he thinks rationally (in contrast to the sculptor, who also creates works in a particular place), in as much as his work must have a usable value. His creations are based on an understanding of the behaviour of his materials - he is a technician. But he is also an artist, because he seeks to achieve an aesthetically pleasing result.

The choreographer, as an architect of movements, is, first of all, a technician. He knows the possibilities of the body (anatomy, physiology, pathology). His knowledge is based on experience, since he has sweated on the dance floor, as the good architect has paced for years on the scaffolding of his building-sites. And of course he must delight the spectator and/or make him think.

The making of both choreographers and architects requires: (a) extensive practical training, "taking the clay in their hands", dancing and teaching dance. (b) extensive study, research, reading and reflection, to gain the necessary theoretical equipment.

Prof. Alkis Raftis President of the International Dance Council CID UNESCO, Paris

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